Two USB 3.0 ports in ExpressCard / 34 format for laptops

This story began in a rather gloomy period.of my life when I was debugging an interactive Eulampia lamp. No, usually I check the connections at least twice, but after a dozen connections I get tired, and I decided that it would work.
Didn’t get off. Reversed the polarity of the power supply from the USB-Serial converter to the Arduino Pro Mini. I just found out about it - right away minus two (out of three) laptop USB ports. Of course, I could not be stopped, and I finished debugging on the latter.
However, you had to do something with all this,and I really did not want to fence the garden of wires. And then I again remembered the expansion cards for laptops, especially since my Lenovo IdeaPad Y550 is just equipped with an ExpressCard / 34 slot.
In general, now I have 5USB ports, and the USB 3.0 duo is really noticeably faster than the triple of USB 2.0. Anyway, this card is a relevant thing when there are not enough ports and interfaces in systems with ExpressCard / 34 or / 54 slots.
The card was sent by Yanwen logisticians, i.e.It was monitored exactly until the moment of crossing the border with Russia. In a simple bag, without any additional protection, except for a little foamed polyethylene.
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However, both the card and the mini-CD with software arrived inintegrity and safety. And besides them, there was nothing more in the package. However, despite the apparent integrity, the contents of the compact could not be read. But in my memory, such discs, which are almost transparent in transparency, are always read very, very poorly.
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About ExpressCard



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Looking “in the teeth” to my laptop, I realized thatI am the owner of the free ExpressCard / 34 slot. But to be one hundred percent sure, I went to the official website, where I made sure that I understood everything correctly. Why am I checking twice? Bore because.
And only after that I ordered the necessary adapter, regretting, of course, that the IdeaPad Y550 has only 34 mm, not 54 mm, which could accommodate from 3 to 4 USB 3.0 ports.
Installation is elementary. All that is needed is to remove the plug and insert the adapter in its place. Windows 8.1 detects this thing instantly and does not require additional drivers.
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I checked the write and read speeds on four ports (two old USB 2.0 on one controller, I think it makes no sense to test both) using H2testw v1.4 and this is what happened:
As a landfill, the ADATA Pro S102 USB 3.0 flash drive with 6330 MB of free space (from 16 GB) was used.
The characteristics of the flash drive indicate that for the 128 GB model, the write speed limit is 50 MB / s, and the read speed is 100 MB / s. I did not find the official benchmark for the 16 GB model.
System: Pentium Dual-Core T4300 @ 2100 MHz, 2 GB RAM, Windows 8.1 32bit.
USB 2.0 # 1
Writing speed: 14.7 MByte / s
Reading speed: 24.2 MByte / s
USB 2.0 # 2
Writing speed: 14.4 MByte / s
Reading speed: 27.1 MByte / s
USB 3.0 # 1
Writing speed: 21.3 MByte / s
Reading speed: 66.7 MByte / s
USB 3.0 # 2
Writing speed: 21.3 MByte / s
Reading speed: 62.7 MByte / s

For comparison, CrystalDiskMark 3.0.3 on the same system:
. USB 2.0:

. USB 3.0:

As you can see, the adapter really behaves very well compared to the built-in ports. So I'm quite happy with this thing.
And yet this thing, as I see it, has a right to exist when either more ports are needed, or existing ones die.
ps. The attentive reader, of course, noticed that at first I cried about the death of two ports, and in the final I rejoice at five. And, of course, does not understand what happened. And this is what happened.
After a couple of days of grief, I thought it won’t hurtat least for the sake of conscience, remove the "dead" ports from the device manager and install them again. And really - it didn’t hurt. Both ports came to life and still delight me with their work.
pps Yes, some elementary things sometimes reach me hard (and for a long time). Especially when the vacation is not expected, and affairs - above the roof.